Traditional recipes

9 Foods People Eat in North Korea Slideshow

9 Foods People Eat in North Korea Slideshow

Step inside one of the world’s most isolated countries by taking a look at the typical diet

Take a peek inside an oft-isolated culture to see what typical food looks like for over 24 million citizens.

9 Foods People Eat in North Korea

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When it comes to food, North Korea’s recent past has been tragic. The great famine of the 1990s, roughly between 1994 and 1998, caused the deaths of between 600,000 and 2.5 million individuals. Kim Jong-il, the leader at the time, both denied aid to the most at-risk regions until 1997 and punished those who attempted to buy, earn, smuggle, or steal food. A number of North Koreans still die of starvation every year, but many more suffer from insufficient diets. The divide between the wealthy and the poor in North Korea is significant, with the average citizen surviving on an annual income of $1,000 to $2,000 and frequenting foods like boiled rice, maize porridge, and kimchi, with little to no protein.

We’ve compiled a list of nine customary foods found in the North Korean diet. Take a peek inside an oft-isolated culture to see what typical food looks like for over 24 million citizens.

Injo Gogi Bap

This popular street food evolved from necessity due to the famine in the 1990s, when North Koreans couldn’t allow food to go to waste. Leftover soybeans were made into sausages, and today, they’re a popular delicacy served with spicy sauce and rice.

Kimchi

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A staple of the North Korean diet, usually consumed daily, kimchi is a fermented dish consisting of cucumbers or cabbage soaked in brine made from chiles, garlic, and ginger, and sometimes made with bean paste.

Maize Porridge

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Porridge made with corn is a common breakfast staple in North Korea.

Naengmyun

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Cold noodles, called naengmyun, are part of a common North Korean meal. They are made with wheat, buckwheat, and potatoes.

Bulgogi

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This North Korean barbecue dish often served in restaurants is marinated meat, which customers grill themselves inside the eatery over a charcoal fire or small gas stove.

Sinseollo

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Dinner at a restaurant in Pyongyang, North Korea’s capital, typically costs between $7 and $40 depending on the venue. But these are prohibitive prices for all but the wealthiest North Koreans. Sinseollo, a typical restaurant menu item, consists of raw vegetables, meat, and dumplings. The customer is provided with a pan of water and a coal fire in order to cook their own meal.

Soondae

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Soondae is both a street food and North Korea’s version of blood sausage, which is usually made with fresh ginger, sesame seeds, and beef or pork small intestine.

Tofu Bap

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Another North Korean street food, this dish is tofu stuffed with rice.


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The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) was established under a Korean Stalinist communist, Kim Il-Sung, in August, 1948. North Korea invaded South Korea in June 1950. By October 1950, UN forces had driven the North Korean army back to the border with China. In November 1950, the Chinese army invaded Korea and drove UN forces back to the 38th Parallel. An Armistice Agreement was reached in 1953, effectively ending the Korean War.

Kim Il Sung ruled North Korea until he died in 1994. His communist party ruled North Korea through terror and genocide. In a succession strangely reminiscent of Korean royal dynasties, Kim Il Sung’s son, Kim Jong-Il took power in 1994 and maintained totalitarian communist rule. Now he has died and power has passed to the next in the dynastic line, his son, Kim Jong-Un.

The Kim regimes have committed genocide and political mass killings since the creation of North Korea. Genocide Watch has ample proof that genocide has been committed and mass killing is still underway in North Korea. Our prediction is that when North Korean people eventually rise up against their totalitarian government, which is almost inevitable, North Korea’s powerful million-man army, now armed with nuclear weapons, will be used to crush the revolt. We predict that North Korea could become the worst politicide since World War Two.

North Korea has already committed genocide against citizens who belong to minority racial, religious, political, and national groups. Before Korea was divided in 1948, there were millions of Christians who lived in North Korea. According to Robert Park, the author of “North Korea and the Genocide Convention,” about 30 percent of the population in Pyongyang was Christian before the division. However, when Kim Il-Sung became the leader of North Korea, the country became the “worst violator of religious freedom in the world” and committed mass killings of Christians (Park, 2011). Hundreds of thousands of Christians were murdered by the regime and many more are still held in prison camps today. Open Doors USA reported that about 200,000 North Koreans are currently held in political prison camps and about 50,000 of them are Christians (Kerby, 2011).

National and racial groups have also been targeted by the North Korean regime. Many North Koreans have fled to China since 1948. Many refugees are women and eighty percent of those who remain in China are forced into prostitution or forced marriages (Park, 2011). China also returns North Korean women to North Korea even if they are married to Chinese citizens. They are usually executed or sent to concentration camps. Women who are impregnated by men who are not North Koreans, often Chinese or Chinese-Korean, are forced into having abortions in order to prevent other national or racial groups from becoming part of the North Korean population. Children who are not fully North Korean are murdered by the North Korean regime.

Widespread politicide has also been committed by the regime. People suspected of holding non-communist political opinions or who are not ethnically fully North Korean are held in concentration camps or prisons. According to a report released by Amnesty International, most of the political prisoners are held in “Total Control Zones,” from which they will never be able to leave. These zones have grown over the last decade into a vast gulag. Over 200,000 North Koreans are held in these prison camps and a third of them are children (Park, 2011).

According to former guards and heads of these prison camps, prisoners are treated inhumanely by being used for medical experiments as well as exterminated in gas chambers. Children born in the gulag will be slave laborers for life. N.C. Heiken, the director of the film “Kimjongilia,” claims, “this child is being raised as a slave or an animal” (Park, 2011).

Famine, caused by North Korea’s disastrously inefficient food production and distribution system, and also intentionally caused by the state by refusal to distribute food to entire regions has caused millions of deaths from starvation since 1948, especially in the 1980’s. Food shortages continue to be a

major reason why North Koreans are dying today. The United Nations World Food Program reports that North Korea is facing the worst food shortage in the world today.

North Korea has a population of 24 million and a quarter of them, 6 million people, are severely suffering from food shortages and malnutrition. The government feeds its million-man army well, and devotes much of it budget to weapons production and nuclear arms development. The government does not spend enough to purchase food for its own citizens. Children are severely mal-nourished. Refugees who have managed to flee from North Korea tell the media that people are starving to death and eating manure when there is nothing else to eat.

North Korea is a serial killer state. To make matters worse, it now has the capacity to commit the ultimate genocide. North Korea has joined the exclusive club of nations with nuclear weapons. Even if other nations wanted to exercise the responsibility to protect North Korea’s people, a nuclear-armed North Korea, backed by China, would render intervention impossible. The border of North Korea is only a few kilometers from Seoul, South Korea, which has become a democracy and an economic power. A North Korean invasion of South Korea would kill millions of people and even result in nuclear war.

Six-Party talks have been underway since 2003 with North Korea, South Korea, China, Japan, the United States, and Russia but have resulted in no improvements for the human rights of the North Korean people. North Korea has launched missiles several times in the sea near Japan. In March 2010, North Korea was almost certainly responsible for sinking the Cheonan, a South Korean Navy patrol ship, which killed 46 South Korean sailors. North Korea is not only committing mass killings of its own people, but also threatening international peace and security.

How has the North Korean regime been able to get away with mass killings since 1948?

The failure of the US, South Korea, and the UN to take effective action to respond to North Korean attacks is one of the main reasons.

Irregular six-party talks and sanctions do not seem to have much impact on the North Korean regime. Current sanctions harm North Korean citizens, and not the leaders of the regime. Economic sanctions and suspending food aid for North Korea only starve common people.

When North Korea attacked the Cheonan, neither the United States, South Korea, nor the United Nations took any retaliatory actions that affected the leadership of North Korea. Instead, the United States only expanded its economic sanctions and the United Nations Security Council wasn't even able to hold North Korea accountable because of the threat of a veto by China.


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The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) was established under a Korean Stalinist communist, Kim Il-Sung, in August, 1948. North Korea invaded South Korea in June 1950. By October 1950, UN forces had driven the North Korean army back to the border with China. In November 1950, the Chinese army invaded Korea and drove UN forces back to the 38th Parallel. An Armistice Agreement was reached in 1953, effectively ending the Korean War.

Kim Il Sung ruled North Korea until he died in 1994. His communist party ruled North Korea through terror and genocide. In a succession strangely reminiscent of Korean royal dynasties, Kim Il Sung’s son, Kim Jong-Il took power in 1994 and maintained totalitarian communist rule. Now he has died and power has passed to the next in the dynastic line, his son, Kim Jong-Un.

The Kim regimes have committed genocide and political mass killings since the creation of North Korea. Genocide Watch has ample proof that genocide has been committed and mass killing is still underway in North Korea. Our prediction is that when North Korean people eventually rise up against their totalitarian government, which is almost inevitable, North Korea’s powerful million-man army, now armed with nuclear weapons, will be used to crush the revolt. We predict that North Korea could become the worst politicide since World War Two.

North Korea has already committed genocide against citizens who belong to minority racial, religious, political, and national groups. Before Korea was divided in 1948, there were millions of Christians who lived in North Korea. According to Robert Park, the author of “North Korea and the Genocide Convention,” about 30 percent of the population in Pyongyang was Christian before the division. However, when Kim Il-Sung became the leader of North Korea, the country became the “worst violator of religious freedom in the world” and committed mass killings of Christians (Park, 2011). Hundreds of thousands of Christians were murdered by the regime and many more are still held in prison camps today. Open Doors USA reported that about 200,000 North Koreans are currently held in political prison camps and about 50,000 of them are Christians (Kerby, 2011).

National and racial groups have also been targeted by the North Korean regime. Many North Koreans have fled to China since 1948. Many refugees are women and eighty percent of those who remain in China are forced into prostitution or forced marriages (Park, 2011). China also returns North Korean women to North Korea even if they are married to Chinese citizens. They are usually executed or sent to concentration camps. Women who are impregnated by men who are not North Koreans, often Chinese or Chinese-Korean, are forced into having abortions in order to prevent other national or racial groups from becoming part of the North Korean population. Children who are not fully North Korean are murdered by the North Korean regime.

Widespread politicide has also been committed by the regime. People suspected of holding non-communist political opinions or who are not ethnically fully North Korean are held in concentration camps or prisons. According to a report released by Amnesty International, most of the political prisoners are held in “Total Control Zones,” from which they will never be able to leave. These zones have grown over the last decade into a vast gulag. Over 200,000 North Koreans are held in these prison camps and a third of them are children (Park, 2011).

According to former guards and heads of these prison camps, prisoners are treated inhumanely by being used for medical experiments as well as exterminated in gas chambers. Children born in the gulag will be slave laborers for life. N.C. Heiken, the director of the film “Kimjongilia,” claims, “this child is being raised as a slave or an animal” (Park, 2011).

Famine, caused by North Korea’s disastrously inefficient food production and distribution system, and also intentionally caused by the state by refusal to distribute food to entire regions has caused millions of deaths from starvation since 1948, especially in the 1980’s. Food shortages continue to be a

major reason why North Koreans are dying today. The United Nations World Food Program reports that North Korea is facing the worst food shortage in the world today.

North Korea has a population of 24 million and a quarter of them, 6 million people, are severely suffering from food shortages and malnutrition. The government feeds its million-man army well, and devotes much of it budget to weapons production and nuclear arms development. The government does not spend enough to purchase food for its own citizens. Children are severely mal-nourished. Refugees who have managed to flee from North Korea tell the media that people are starving to death and eating manure when there is nothing else to eat.

North Korea is a serial killer state. To make matters worse, it now has the capacity to commit the ultimate genocide. North Korea has joined the exclusive club of nations with nuclear weapons. Even if other nations wanted to exercise the responsibility to protect North Korea’s people, a nuclear-armed North Korea, backed by China, would render intervention impossible. The border of North Korea is only a few kilometers from Seoul, South Korea, which has become a democracy and an economic power. A North Korean invasion of South Korea would kill millions of people and even result in nuclear war.

Six-Party talks have been underway since 2003 with North Korea, South Korea, China, Japan, the United States, and Russia but have resulted in no improvements for the human rights of the North Korean people. North Korea has launched missiles several times in the sea near Japan. In March 2010, North Korea was almost certainly responsible for sinking the Cheonan, a South Korean Navy patrol ship, which killed 46 South Korean sailors. North Korea is not only committing mass killings of its own people, but also threatening international peace and security.

How has the North Korean regime been able to get away with mass killings since 1948?

The failure of the US, South Korea, and the UN to take effective action to respond to North Korean attacks is one of the main reasons.

Irregular six-party talks and sanctions do not seem to have much impact on the North Korean regime. Current sanctions harm North Korean citizens, and not the leaders of the regime. Economic sanctions and suspending food aid for North Korea only starve common people.

When North Korea attacked the Cheonan, neither the United States, South Korea, nor the United Nations took any retaliatory actions that affected the leadership of North Korea. Instead, the United States only expanded its economic sanctions and the United Nations Security Council wasn't even able to hold North Korea accountable because of the threat of a veto by China.


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The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) was established under a Korean Stalinist communist, Kim Il-Sung, in August, 1948. North Korea invaded South Korea in June 1950. By October 1950, UN forces had driven the North Korean army back to the border with China. In November 1950, the Chinese army invaded Korea and drove UN forces back to the 38th Parallel. An Armistice Agreement was reached in 1953, effectively ending the Korean War.

Kim Il Sung ruled North Korea until he died in 1994. His communist party ruled North Korea through terror and genocide. In a succession strangely reminiscent of Korean royal dynasties, Kim Il Sung’s son, Kim Jong-Il took power in 1994 and maintained totalitarian communist rule. Now he has died and power has passed to the next in the dynastic line, his son, Kim Jong-Un.

The Kim regimes have committed genocide and political mass killings since the creation of North Korea. Genocide Watch has ample proof that genocide has been committed and mass killing is still underway in North Korea. Our prediction is that when North Korean people eventually rise up against their totalitarian government, which is almost inevitable, North Korea’s powerful million-man army, now armed with nuclear weapons, will be used to crush the revolt. We predict that North Korea could become the worst politicide since World War Two.

North Korea has already committed genocide against citizens who belong to minority racial, religious, political, and national groups. Before Korea was divided in 1948, there were millions of Christians who lived in North Korea. According to Robert Park, the author of “North Korea and the Genocide Convention,” about 30 percent of the population in Pyongyang was Christian before the division. However, when Kim Il-Sung became the leader of North Korea, the country became the “worst violator of religious freedom in the world” and committed mass killings of Christians (Park, 2011). Hundreds of thousands of Christians were murdered by the regime and many more are still held in prison camps today. Open Doors USA reported that about 200,000 North Koreans are currently held in political prison camps and about 50,000 of them are Christians (Kerby, 2011).

National and racial groups have also been targeted by the North Korean regime. Many North Koreans have fled to China since 1948. Many refugees are women and eighty percent of those who remain in China are forced into prostitution or forced marriages (Park, 2011). China also returns North Korean women to North Korea even if they are married to Chinese citizens. They are usually executed or sent to concentration camps. Women who are impregnated by men who are not North Koreans, often Chinese or Chinese-Korean, are forced into having abortions in order to prevent other national or racial groups from becoming part of the North Korean population. Children who are not fully North Korean are murdered by the North Korean regime.

Widespread politicide has also been committed by the regime. People suspected of holding non-communist political opinions or who are not ethnically fully North Korean are held in concentration camps or prisons. According to a report released by Amnesty International, most of the political prisoners are held in “Total Control Zones,” from which they will never be able to leave. These zones have grown over the last decade into a vast gulag. Over 200,000 North Koreans are held in these prison camps and a third of them are children (Park, 2011).

According to former guards and heads of these prison camps, prisoners are treated inhumanely by being used for medical experiments as well as exterminated in gas chambers. Children born in the gulag will be slave laborers for life. N.C. Heiken, the director of the film “Kimjongilia,” claims, “this child is being raised as a slave or an animal” (Park, 2011).

Famine, caused by North Korea’s disastrously inefficient food production and distribution system, and also intentionally caused by the state by refusal to distribute food to entire regions has caused millions of deaths from starvation since 1948, especially in the 1980’s. Food shortages continue to be a

major reason why North Koreans are dying today. The United Nations World Food Program reports that North Korea is facing the worst food shortage in the world today.

North Korea has a population of 24 million and a quarter of them, 6 million people, are severely suffering from food shortages and malnutrition. The government feeds its million-man army well, and devotes much of it budget to weapons production and nuclear arms development. The government does not spend enough to purchase food for its own citizens. Children are severely mal-nourished. Refugees who have managed to flee from North Korea tell the media that people are starving to death and eating manure when there is nothing else to eat.

North Korea is a serial killer state. To make matters worse, it now has the capacity to commit the ultimate genocide. North Korea has joined the exclusive club of nations with nuclear weapons. Even if other nations wanted to exercise the responsibility to protect North Korea’s people, a nuclear-armed North Korea, backed by China, would render intervention impossible. The border of North Korea is only a few kilometers from Seoul, South Korea, which has become a democracy and an economic power. A North Korean invasion of South Korea would kill millions of people and even result in nuclear war.

Six-Party talks have been underway since 2003 with North Korea, South Korea, China, Japan, the United States, and Russia but have resulted in no improvements for the human rights of the North Korean people. North Korea has launched missiles several times in the sea near Japan. In March 2010, North Korea was almost certainly responsible for sinking the Cheonan, a South Korean Navy patrol ship, which killed 46 South Korean sailors. North Korea is not only committing mass killings of its own people, but also threatening international peace and security.

How has the North Korean regime been able to get away with mass killings since 1948?

The failure of the US, South Korea, and the UN to take effective action to respond to North Korean attacks is one of the main reasons.

Irregular six-party talks and sanctions do not seem to have much impact on the North Korean regime. Current sanctions harm North Korean citizens, and not the leaders of the regime. Economic sanctions and suspending food aid for North Korea only starve common people.

When North Korea attacked the Cheonan, neither the United States, South Korea, nor the United Nations took any retaliatory actions that affected the leadership of North Korea. Instead, the United States only expanded its economic sanctions and the United Nations Security Council wasn't even able to hold North Korea accountable because of the threat of a veto by China.


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The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) was established under a Korean Stalinist communist, Kim Il-Sung, in August, 1948. North Korea invaded South Korea in June 1950. By October 1950, UN forces had driven the North Korean army back to the border with China. In November 1950, the Chinese army invaded Korea and drove UN forces back to the 38th Parallel. An Armistice Agreement was reached in 1953, effectively ending the Korean War.

Kim Il Sung ruled North Korea until he died in 1994. His communist party ruled North Korea through terror and genocide. In a succession strangely reminiscent of Korean royal dynasties, Kim Il Sung’s son, Kim Jong-Il took power in 1994 and maintained totalitarian communist rule. Now he has died and power has passed to the next in the dynastic line, his son, Kim Jong-Un.

The Kim regimes have committed genocide and political mass killings since the creation of North Korea. Genocide Watch has ample proof that genocide has been committed and mass killing is still underway in North Korea. Our prediction is that when North Korean people eventually rise up against their totalitarian government, which is almost inevitable, North Korea’s powerful million-man army, now armed with nuclear weapons, will be used to crush the revolt. We predict that North Korea could become the worst politicide since World War Two.

North Korea has already committed genocide against citizens who belong to minority racial, religious, political, and national groups. Before Korea was divided in 1948, there were millions of Christians who lived in North Korea. According to Robert Park, the author of “North Korea and the Genocide Convention,” about 30 percent of the population in Pyongyang was Christian before the division. However, when Kim Il-Sung became the leader of North Korea, the country became the “worst violator of religious freedom in the world” and committed mass killings of Christians (Park, 2011). Hundreds of thousands of Christians were murdered by the regime and many more are still held in prison camps today. Open Doors USA reported that about 200,000 North Koreans are currently held in political prison camps and about 50,000 of them are Christians (Kerby, 2011).

National and racial groups have also been targeted by the North Korean regime. Many North Koreans have fled to China since 1948. Many refugees are women and eighty percent of those who remain in China are forced into prostitution or forced marriages (Park, 2011). China also returns North Korean women to North Korea even if they are married to Chinese citizens. They are usually executed or sent to concentration camps. Women who are impregnated by men who are not North Koreans, often Chinese or Chinese-Korean, are forced into having abortions in order to prevent other national or racial groups from becoming part of the North Korean population. Children who are not fully North Korean are murdered by the North Korean regime.

Widespread politicide has also been committed by the regime. People suspected of holding non-communist political opinions or who are not ethnically fully North Korean are held in concentration camps or prisons. According to a report released by Amnesty International, most of the political prisoners are held in “Total Control Zones,” from which they will never be able to leave. These zones have grown over the last decade into a vast gulag. Over 200,000 North Koreans are held in these prison camps and a third of them are children (Park, 2011).

According to former guards and heads of these prison camps, prisoners are treated inhumanely by being used for medical experiments as well as exterminated in gas chambers. Children born in the gulag will be slave laborers for life. N.C. Heiken, the director of the film “Kimjongilia,” claims, “this child is being raised as a slave or an animal” (Park, 2011).

Famine, caused by North Korea’s disastrously inefficient food production and distribution system, and also intentionally caused by the state by refusal to distribute food to entire regions has caused millions of deaths from starvation since 1948, especially in the 1980’s. Food shortages continue to be a

major reason why North Koreans are dying today. The United Nations World Food Program reports that North Korea is facing the worst food shortage in the world today.

North Korea has a population of 24 million and a quarter of them, 6 million people, are severely suffering from food shortages and malnutrition. The government feeds its million-man army well, and devotes much of it budget to weapons production and nuclear arms development. The government does not spend enough to purchase food for its own citizens. Children are severely mal-nourished. Refugees who have managed to flee from North Korea tell the media that people are starving to death and eating manure when there is nothing else to eat.

North Korea is a serial killer state. To make matters worse, it now has the capacity to commit the ultimate genocide. North Korea has joined the exclusive club of nations with nuclear weapons. Even if other nations wanted to exercise the responsibility to protect North Korea’s people, a nuclear-armed North Korea, backed by China, would render intervention impossible. The border of North Korea is only a few kilometers from Seoul, South Korea, which has become a democracy and an economic power. A North Korean invasion of South Korea would kill millions of people and even result in nuclear war.

Six-Party talks have been underway since 2003 with North Korea, South Korea, China, Japan, the United States, and Russia but have resulted in no improvements for the human rights of the North Korean people. North Korea has launched missiles several times in the sea near Japan. In March 2010, North Korea was almost certainly responsible for sinking the Cheonan, a South Korean Navy patrol ship, which killed 46 South Korean sailors. North Korea is not only committing mass killings of its own people, but also threatening international peace and security.

How has the North Korean regime been able to get away with mass killings since 1948?

The failure of the US, South Korea, and the UN to take effective action to respond to North Korean attacks is one of the main reasons.

Irregular six-party talks and sanctions do not seem to have much impact on the North Korean regime. Current sanctions harm North Korean citizens, and not the leaders of the regime. Economic sanctions and suspending food aid for North Korea only starve common people.

When North Korea attacked the Cheonan, neither the United States, South Korea, nor the United Nations took any retaliatory actions that affected the leadership of North Korea. Instead, the United States only expanded its economic sanctions and the United Nations Security Council wasn't even able to hold North Korea accountable because of the threat of a veto by China.


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The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) was established under a Korean Stalinist communist, Kim Il-Sung, in August, 1948. North Korea invaded South Korea in June 1950. By October 1950, UN forces had driven the North Korean army back to the border with China. In November 1950, the Chinese army invaded Korea and drove UN forces back to the 38th Parallel. An Armistice Agreement was reached in 1953, effectively ending the Korean War.

Kim Il Sung ruled North Korea until he died in 1994. His communist party ruled North Korea through terror and genocide. In a succession strangely reminiscent of Korean royal dynasties, Kim Il Sung’s son, Kim Jong-Il took power in 1994 and maintained totalitarian communist rule. Now he has died and power has passed to the next in the dynastic line, his son, Kim Jong-Un.

The Kim regimes have committed genocide and political mass killings since the creation of North Korea. Genocide Watch has ample proof that genocide has been committed and mass killing is still underway in North Korea. Our prediction is that when North Korean people eventually rise up against their totalitarian government, which is almost inevitable, North Korea’s powerful million-man army, now armed with nuclear weapons, will be used to crush the revolt. We predict that North Korea could become the worst politicide since World War Two.

North Korea has already committed genocide against citizens who belong to minority racial, religious, political, and national groups. Before Korea was divided in 1948, there were millions of Christians who lived in North Korea. According to Robert Park, the author of “North Korea and the Genocide Convention,” about 30 percent of the population in Pyongyang was Christian before the division. However, when Kim Il-Sung became the leader of North Korea, the country became the “worst violator of religious freedom in the world” and committed mass killings of Christians (Park, 2011). Hundreds of thousands of Christians were murdered by the regime and many more are still held in prison camps today. Open Doors USA reported that about 200,000 North Koreans are currently held in political prison camps and about 50,000 of them are Christians (Kerby, 2011).

National and racial groups have also been targeted by the North Korean regime. Many North Koreans have fled to China since 1948. Many refugees are women and eighty percent of those who remain in China are forced into prostitution or forced marriages (Park, 2011). China also returns North Korean women to North Korea even if they are married to Chinese citizens. They are usually executed or sent to concentration camps. Women who are impregnated by men who are not North Koreans, often Chinese or Chinese-Korean, are forced into having abortions in order to prevent other national or racial groups from becoming part of the North Korean population. Children who are not fully North Korean are murdered by the North Korean regime.

Widespread politicide has also been committed by the regime. People suspected of holding non-communist political opinions or who are not ethnically fully North Korean are held in concentration camps or prisons. According to a report released by Amnesty International, most of the political prisoners are held in “Total Control Zones,” from which they will never be able to leave. These zones have grown over the last decade into a vast gulag. Over 200,000 North Koreans are held in these prison camps and a third of them are children (Park, 2011).

According to former guards and heads of these prison camps, prisoners are treated inhumanely by being used for medical experiments as well as exterminated in gas chambers. Children born in the gulag will be slave laborers for life. N.C. Heiken, the director of the film “Kimjongilia,” claims, “this child is being raised as a slave or an animal” (Park, 2011).

Famine, caused by North Korea’s disastrously inefficient food production and distribution system, and also intentionally caused by the state by refusal to distribute food to entire regions has caused millions of deaths from starvation since 1948, especially in the 1980’s. Food shortages continue to be a

major reason why North Koreans are dying today. The United Nations World Food Program reports that North Korea is facing the worst food shortage in the world today.

North Korea has a population of 24 million and a quarter of them, 6 million people, are severely suffering from food shortages and malnutrition. The government feeds its million-man army well, and devotes much of it budget to weapons production and nuclear arms development. The government does not spend enough to purchase food for its own citizens. Children are severely mal-nourished. Refugees who have managed to flee from North Korea tell the media that people are starving to death and eating manure when there is nothing else to eat.

North Korea is a serial killer state. To make matters worse, it now has the capacity to commit the ultimate genocide. North Korea has joined the exclusive club of nations with nuclear weapons. Even if other nations wanted to exercise the responsibility to protect North Korea’s people, a nuclear-armed North Korea, backed by China, would render intervention impossible. The border of North Korea is only a few kilometers from Seoul, South Korea, which has become a democracy and an economic power. A North Korean invasion of South Korea would kill millions of people and even result in nuclear war.

Six-Party talks have been underway since 2003 with North Korea, South Korea, China, Japan, the United States, and Russia but have resulted in no improvements for the human rights of the North Korean people. North Korea has launched missiles several times in the sea near Japan. In March 2010, North Korea was almost certainly responsible for sinking the Cheonan, a South Korean Navy patrol ship, which killed 46 South Korean sailors. North Korea is not only committing mass killings of its own people, but also threatening international peace and security.

How has the North Korean regime been able to get away with mass killings since 1948?

The failure of the US, South Korea, and the UN to take effective action to respond to North Korean attacks is one of the main reasons.

Irregular six-party talks and sanctions do not seem to have much impact on the North Korean regime. Current sanctions harm North Korean citizens, and not the leaders of the regime. Economic sanctions and suspending food aid for North Korea only starve common people.

When North Korea attacked the Cheonan, neither the United States, South Korea, nor the United Nations took any retaliatory actions that affected the leadership of North Korea. Instead, the United States only expanded its economic sanctions and the United Nations Security Council wasn't even able to hold North Korea accountable because of the threat of a veto by China.


Facebook

The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) was established under a Korean Stalinist communist, Kim Il-Sung, in August, 1948. North Korea invaded South Korea in June 1950. By October 1950, UN forces had driven the North Korean army back to the border with China. In November 1950, the Chinese army invaded Korea and drove UN forces back to the 38th Parallel. An Armistice Agreement was reached in 1953, effectively ending the Korean War.

Kim Il Sung ruled North Korea until he died in 1994. His communist party ruled North Korea through terror and genocide. In a succession strangely reminiscent of Korean royal dynasties, Kim Il Sung’s son, Kim Jong-Il took power in 1994 and maintained totalitarian communist rule. Now he has died and power has passed to the next in the dynastic line, his son, Kim Jong-Un.

The Kim regimes have committed genocide and political mass killings since the creation of North Korea. Genocide Watch has ample proof that genocide has been committed and mass killing is still underway in North Korea. Our prediction is that when North Korean people eventually rise up against their totalitarian government, which is almost inevitable, North Korea’s powerful million-man army, now armed with nuclear weapons, will be used to crush the revolt. We predict that North Korea could become the worst politicide since World War Two.

North Korea has already committed genocide against citizens who belong to minority racial, religious, political, and national groups. Before Korea was divided in 1948, there were millions of Christians who lived in North Korea. According to Robert Park, the author of “North Korea and the Genocide Convention,” about 30 percent of the population in Pyongyang was Christian before the division. However, when Kim Il-Sung became the leader of North Korea, the country became the “worst violator of religious freedom in the world” and committed mass killings of Christians (Park, 2011). Hundreds of thousands of Christians were murdered by the regime and many more are still held in prison camps today. Open Doors USA reported that about 200,000 North Koreans are currently held in political prison camps and about 50,000 of them are Christians (Kerby, 2011).

National and racial groups have also been targeted by the North Korean regime. Many North Koreans have fled to China since 1948. Many refugees are women and eighty percent of those who remain in China are forced into prostitution or forced marriages (Park, 2011). China also returns North Korean women to North Korea even if they are married to Chinese citizens. They are usually executed or sent to concentration camps. Women who are impregnated by men who are not North Koreans, often Chinese or Chinese-Korean, are forced into having abortions in order to prevent other national or racial groups from becoming part of the North Korean population. Children who are not fully North Korean are murdered by the North Korean regime.

Widespread politicide has also been committed by the regime. People suspected of holding non-communist political opinions or who are not ethnically fully North Korean are held in concentration camps or prisons. According to a report released by Amnesty International, most of the political prisoners are held in “Total Control Zones,” from which they will never be able to leave. These zones have grown over the last decade into a vast gulag. Over 200,000 North Koreans are held in these prison camps and a third of them are children (Park, 2011).

According to former guards and heads of these prison camps, prisoners are treated inhumanely by being used for medical experiments as well as exterminated in gas chambers. Children born in the gulag will be slave laborers for life. N.C. Heiken, the director of the film “Kimjongilia,” claims, “this child is being raised as a slave or an animal” (Park, 2011).

Famine, caused by North Korea’s disastrously inefficient food production and distribution system, and also intentionally caused by the state by refusal to distribute food to entire regions has caused millions of deaths from starvation since 1948, especially in the 1980’s. Food shortages continue to be a

major reason why North Koreans are dying today. The United Nations World Food Program reports that North Korea is facing the worst food shortage in the world today.

North Korea has a population of 24 million and a quarter of them, 6 million people, are severely suffering from food shortages and malnutrition. The government feeds its million-man army well, and devotes much of it budget to weapons production and nuclear arms development. The government does not spend enough to purchase food for its own citizens. Children are severely mal-nourished. Refugees who have managed to flee from North Korea tell the media that people are starving to death and eating manure when there is nothing else to eat.

North Korea is a serial killer state. To make matters worse, it now has the capacity to commit the ultimate genocide. North Korea has joined the exclusive club of nations with nuclear weapons. Even if other nations wanted to exercise the responsibility to protect North Korea’s people, a nuclear-armed North Korea, backed by China, would render intervention impossible. The border of North Korea is only a few kilometers from Seoul, South Korea, which has become a democracy and an economic power. A North Korean invasion of South Korea would kill millions of people and even result in nuclear war.

Six-Party talks have been underway since 2003 with North Korea, South Korea, China, Japan, the United States, and Russia but have resulted in no improvements for the human rights of the North Korean people. North Korea has launched missiles several times in the sea near Japan. In March 2010, North Korea was almost certainly responsible for sinking the Cheonan, a South Korean Navy patrol ship, which killed 46 South Korean sailors. North Korea is not only committing mass killings of its own people, but also threatening international peace and security.

How has the North Korean regime been able to get away with mass killings since 1948?

The failure of the US, South Korea, and the UN to take effective action to respond to North Korean attacks is one of the main reasons.

Irregular six-party talks and sanctions do not seem to have much impact on the North Korean regime. Current sanctions harm North Korean citizens, and not the leaders of the regime. Economic sanctions and suspending food aid for North Korea only starve common people.

When North Korea attacked the Cheonan, neither the United States, South Korea, nor the United Nations took any retaliatory actions that affected the leadership of North Korea. Instead, the United States only expanded its economic sanctions and the United Nations Security Council wasn't even able to hold North Korea accountable because of the threat of a veto by China.


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The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) was established under a Korean Stalinist communist, Kim Il-Sung, in August, 1948. North Korea invaded South Korea in June 1950. By October 1950, UN forces had driven the North Korean army back to the border with China. In November 1950, the Chinese army invaded Korea and drove UN forces back to the 38th Parallel. An Armistice Agreement was reached in 1953, effectively ending the Korean War.

Kim Il Sung ruled North Korea until he died in 1994. His communist party ruled North Korea through terror and genocide. In a succession strangely reminiscent of Korean royal dynasties, Kim Il Sung’s son, Kim Jong-Il took power in 1994 and maintained totalitarian communist rule. Now he has died and power has passed to the next in the dynastic line, his son, Kim Jong-Un.

The Kim regimes have committed genocide and political mass killings since the creation of North Korea. Genocide Watch has ample proof that genocide has been committed and mass killing is still underway in North Korea. Our prediction is that when North Korean people eventually rise up against their totalitarian government, which is almost inevitable, North Korea’s powerful million-man army, now armed with nuclear weapons, will be used to crush the revolt. We predict that North Korea could become the worst politicide since World War Two.

North Korea has already committed genocide against citizens who belong to minority racial, religious, political, and national groups. Before Korea was divided in 1948, there were millions of Christians who lived in North Korea. According to Robert Park, the author of “North Korea and the Genocide Convention,” about 30 percent of the population in Pyongyang was Christian before the division. However, when Kim Il-Sung became the leader of North Korea, the country became the “worst violator of religious freedom in the world” and committed mass killings of Christians (Park, 2011). Hundreds of thousands of Christians were murdered by the regime and many more are still held in prison camps today. Open Doors USA reported that about 200,000 North Koreans are currently held in political prison camps and about 50,000 of them are Christians (Kerby, 2011).

National and racial groups have also been targeted by the North Korean regime. Many North Koreans have fled to China since 1948. Many refugees are women and eighty percent of those who remain in China are forced into prostitution or forced marriages (Park, 2011). China also returns North Korean women to North Korea even if they are married to Chinese citizens. They are usually executed or sent to concentration camps. Women who are impregnated by men who are not North Koreans, often Chinese or Chinese-Korean, are forced into having abortions in order to prevent other national or racial groups from becoming part of the North Korean population. Children who are not fully North Korean are murdered by the North Korean regime.

Widespread politicide has also been committed by the regime. People suspected of holding non-communist political opinions or who are not ethnically fully North Korean are held in concentration camps or prisons. According to a report released by Amnesty International, most of the political prisoners are held in “Total Control Zones,” from which they will never be able to leave. These zones have grown over the last decade into a vast gulag. Over 200,000 North Koreans are held in these prison camps and a third of them are children (Park, 2011).

According to former guards and heads of these prison camps, prisoners are treated inhumanely by being used for medical experiments as well as exterminated in gas chambers. Children born in the gulag will be slave laborers for life. N.C. Heiken, the director of the film “Kimjongilia,” claims, “this child is being raised as a slave or an animal” (Park, 2011).

Famine, caused by North Korea’s disastrously inefficient food production and distribution system, and also intentionally caused by the state by refusal to distribute food to entire regions has caused millions of deaths from starvation since 1948, especially in the 1980’s. Food shortages continue to be a

major reason why North Koreans are dying today. The United Nations World Food Program reports that North Korea is facing the worst food shortage in the world today.

North Korea has a population of 24 million and a quarter of them, 6 million people, are severely suffering from food shortages and malnutrition. The government feeds its million-man army well, and devotes much of it budget to weapons production and nuclear arms development. The government does not spend enough to purchase food for its own citizens. Children are severely mal-nourished. Refugees who have managed to flee from North Korea tell the media that people are starving to death and eating manure when there is nothing else to eat.

North Korea is a serial killer state. To make matters worse, it now has the capacity to commit the ultimate genocide. North Korea has joined the exclusive club of nations with nuclear weapons. Even if other nations wanted to exercise the responsibility to protect North Korea’s people, a nuclear-armed North Korea, backed by China, would render intervention impossible. The border of North Korea is only a few kilometers from Seoul, South Korea, which has become a democracy and an economic power. A North Korean invasion of South Korea would kill millions of people and even result in nuclear war.

Six-Party talks have been underway since 2003 with North Korea, South Korea, China, Japan, the United States, and Russia but have resulted in no improvements for the human rights of the North Korean people. North Korea has launched missiles several times in the sea near Japan. In March 2010, North Korea was almost certainly responsible for sinking the Cheonan, a South Korean Navy patrol ship, which killed 46 South Korean sailors. North Korea is not only committing mass killings of its own people, but also threatening international peace and security.

How has the North Korean regime been able to get away with mass killings since 1948?

The failure of the US, South Korea, and the UN to take effective action to respond to North Korean attacks is one of the main reasons.

Irregular six-party talks and sanctions do not seem to have much impact on the North Korean regime. Current sanctions harm North Korean citizens, and not the leaders of the regime. Economic sanctions and suspending food aid for North Korea only starve common people.

When North Korea attacked the Cheonan, neither the United States, South Korea, nor the United Nations took any retaliatory actions that affected the leadership of North Korea. Instead, the United States only expanded its economic sanctions and the United Nations Security Council wasn't even able to hold North Korea accountable because of the threat of a veto by China.


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The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) was established under a Korean Stalinist communist, Kim Il-Sung, in August, 1948. North Korea invaded South Korea in June 1950. By October 1950, UN forces had driven the North Korean army back to the border with China. In November 1950, the Chinese army invaded Korea and drove UN forces back to the 38th Parallel. An Armistice Agreement was reached in 1953, effectively ending the Korean War.

Kim Il Sung ruled North Korea until he died in 1994. His communist party ruled North Korea through terror and genocide. In a succession strangely reminiscent of Korean royal dynasties, Kim Il Sung’s son, Kim Jong-Il took power in 1994 and maintained totalitarian communist rule. Now he has died and power has passed to the next in the dynastic line, his son, Kim Jong-Un.

The Kim regimes have committed genocide and political mass killings since the creation of North Korea. Genocide Watch has ample proof that genocide has been committed and mass killing is still underway in North Korea. Our prediction is that when North Korean people eventually rise up against their totalitarian government, which is almost inevitable, North Korea’s powerful million-man army, now armed with nuclear weapons, will be used to crush the revolt. We predict that North Korea could become the worst politicide since World War Two.

North Korea has already committed genocide against citizens who belong to minority racial, religious, political, and national groups. Before Korea was divided in 1948, there were millions of Christians who lived in North Korea. According to Robert Park, the author of “North Korea and the Genocide Convention,” about 30 percent of the population in Pyongyang was Christian before the division. However, when Kim Il-Sung became the leader of North Korea, the country became the “worst violator of religious freedom in the world” and committed mass killings of Christians (Park, 2011). Hundreds of thousands of Christians were murdered by the regime and many more are still held in prison camps today. Open Doors USA reported that about 200,000 North Koreans are currently held in political prison camps and about 50,000 of them are Christians (Kerby, 2011).

National and racial groups have also been targeted by the North Korean regime. Many North Koreans have fled to China since 1948. Many refugees are women and eighty percent of those who remain in China are forced into prostitution or forced marriages (Park, 2011). China also returns North Korean women to North Korea even if they are married to Chinese citizens. They are usually executed or sent to concentration camps. Women who are impregnated by men who are not North Koreans, often Chinese or Chinese-Korean, are forced into having abortions in order to prevent other national or racial groups from becoming part of the North Korean population. Children who are not fully North Korean are murdered by the North Korean regime.

Widespread politicide has also been committed by the regime. People suspected of holding non-communist political opinions or who are not ethnically fully North Korean are held in concentration camps or prisons. According to a report released by Amnesty International, most of the political prisoners are held in “Total Control Zones,” from which they will never be able to leave. These zones have grown over the last decade into a vast gulag. Over 200,000 North Koreans are held in these prison camps and a third of them are children (Park, 2011).

According to former guards and heads of these prison camps, prisoners are treated inhumanely by being used for medical experiments as well as exterminated in gas chambers. Children born in the gulag will be slave laborers for life. N.C. Heiken, the director of the film “Kimjongilia,” claims, “this child is being raised as a slave or an animal” (Park, 2011).

Famine, caused by North Korea’s disastrously inefficient food production and distribution system, and also intentionally caused by the state by refusal to distribute food to entire regions has caused millions of deaths from starvation since 1948, especially in the 1980’s. Food shortages continue to be a

major reason why North Koreans are dying today. The United Nations World Food Program reports that North Korea is facing the worst food shortage in the world today.

North Korea has a population of 24 million and a quarter of them, 6 million people, are severely suffering from food shortages and malnutrition. The government feeds its million-man army well, and devotes much of it budget to weapons production and nuclear arms development. The government does not spend enough to purchase food for its own citizens. Children are severely mal-nourished. Refugees who have managed to flee from North Korea tell the media that people are starving to death and eating manure when there is nothing else to eat.

North Korea is a serial killer state. To make matters worse, it now has the capacity to commit the ultimate genocide. North Korea has joined the exclusive club of nations with nuclear weapons. Even if other nations wanted to exercise the responsibility to protect North Korea’s people, a nuclear-armed North Korea, backed by China, would render intervention impossible. The border of North Korea is only a few kilometers from Seoul, South Korea, which has become a democracy and an economic power. A North Korean invasion of South Korea would kill millions of people and even result in nuclear war.

Six-Party talks have been underway since 2003 with North Korea, South Korea, China, Japan, the United States, and Russia but have resulted in no improvements for the human rights of the North Korean people. North Korea has launched missiles several times in the sea near Japan. In March 2010, North Korea was almost certainly responsible for sinking the Cheonan, a South Korean Navy patrol ship, which killed 46 South Korean sailors. North Korea is not only committing mass killings of its own people, but also threatening international peace and security.

How has the North Korean regime been able to get away with mass killings since 1948?

The failure of the US, South Korea, and the UN to take effective action to respond to North Korean attacks is one of the main reasons.

Irregular six-party talks and sanctions do not seem to have much impact on the North Korean regime. Current sanctions harm North Korean citizens, and not the leaders of the regime. Economic sanctions and suspending food aid for North Korea only starve common people.

When North Korea attacked the Cheonan, neither the United States, South Korea, nor the United Nations took any retaliatory actions that affected the leadership of North Korea. Instead, the United States only expanded its economic sanctions and the United Nations Security Council wasn't even able to hold North Korea accountable because of the threat of a veto by China.


Facebook

The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) was established under a Korean Stalinist communist, Kim Il-Sung, in August, 1948. North Korea invaded South Korea in June 1950. By October 1950, UN forces had driven the North Korean army back to the border with China. In November 1950, the Chinese army invaded Korea and drove UN forces back to the 38th Parallel. An Armistice Agreement was reached in 1953, effectively ending the Korean War.

Kim Il Sung ruled North Korea until he died in 1994. His communist party ruled North Korea through terror and genocide. In a succession strangely reminiscent of Korean royal dynasties, Kim Il Sung’s son, Kim Jong-Il took power in 1994 and maintained totalitarian communist rule. Now he has died and power has passed to the next in the dynastic line, his son, Kim Jong-Un.

The Kim regimes have committed genocide and political mass killings since the creation of North Korea. Genocide Watch has ample proof that genocide has been committed and mass killing is still underway in North Korea. Our prediction is that when North Korean people eventually rise up against their totalitarian government, which is almost inevitable, North Korea’s powerful million-man army, now armed with nuclear weapons, will be used to crush the revolt. We predict that North Korea could become the worst politicide since World War Two.

North Korea has already committed genocide against citizens who belong to minority racial, religious, political, and national groups. Before Korea was divided in 1948, there were millions of Christians who lived in North Korea. According to Robert Park, the author of “North Korea and the Genocide Convention,” about 30 percent of the population in Pyongyang was Christian before the division. However, when Kim Il-Sung became the leader of North Korea, the country became the “worst violator of religious freedom in the world” and committed mass killings of Christians (Park, 2011). Hundreds of thousands of Christians were murdered by the regime and many more are still held in prison camps today. Open Doors USA reported that about 200,000 North Koreans are currently held in political prison camps and about 50,000 of them are Christians (Kerby, 2011).

National and racial groups have also been targeted by the North Korean regime. Many North Koreans have fled to China since 1948. Many refugees are women and eighty percent of those who remain in China are forced into prostitution or forced marriages (Park, 2011). China also returns North Korean women to North Korea even if they are married to Chinese citizens. They are usually executed or sent to concentration camps. Women who are impregnated by men who are not North Koreans, often Chinese or Chinese-Korean, are forced into having abortions in order to prevent other national or racial groups from becoming part of the North Korean population. Children who are not fully North Korean are murdered by the North Korean regime.

Widespread politicide has also been committed by the regime. People suspected of holding non-communist political opinions or who are not ethnically fully North Korean are held in concentration camps or prisons. According to a report released by Amnesty International, most of the political prisoners are held in “Total Control Zones,” from which they will never be able to leave. These zones have grown over the last decade into a vast gulag. Over 200,000 North Koreans are held in these prison camps and a third of them are children (Park, 2011).

According to former guards and heads of these prison camps, prisoners are treated inhumanely by being used for medical experiments as well as exterminated in gas chambers. Children born in the gulag will be slave laborers for life. N.C. Heiken, the director of the film “Kimjongilia,” claims, “this child is being raised as a slave or an animal” (Park, 2011).

Famine, caused by North Korea’s disastrously inefficient food production and distribution system, and also intentionally caused by the state by refusal to distribute food to entire regions has caused millions of deaths from starvation since 1948, especially in the 1980’s. Food shortages continue to be a

major reason why North Koreans are dying today. The United Nations World Food Program reports that North Korea is facing the worst food shortage in the world today.

North Korea has a population of 24 million and a quarter of them, 6 million people, are severely suffering from food shortages and malnutrition. The government feeds its million-man army well, and devotes much of it budget to weapons production and nuclear arms development. The government does not spend enough to purchase food for its own citizens. Children are severely mal-nourished. Refugees who have managed to flee from North Korea tell the media that people are starving to death and eating manure when there is nothing else to eat.

North Korea is a serial killer state. To make matters worse, it now has the capacity to commit the ultimate genocide. North Korea has joined the exclusive club of nations with nuclear weapons. Even if other nations wanted to exercise the responsibility to protect North Korea’s people, a nuclear-armed North Korea, backed by China, would render intervention impossible. The border of North Korea is only a few kilometers from Seoul, South Korea, which has become a democracy and an economic power. A North Korean invasion of South Korea would kill millions of people and even result in nuclear war.

Six-Party talks have been underway since 2003 with North Korea, South Korea, China, Japan, the United States, and Russia but have resulted in no improvements for the human rights of the North Korean people. North Korea has launched missiles several times in the sea near Japan. In March 2010, North Korea was almost certainly responsible for sinking the Cheonan, a South Korean Navy patrol ship, which killed 46 South Korean sailors. North Korea is not only committing mass killings of its own people, but also threatening international peace and security.

How has the North Korean regime been able to get away with mass killings since 1948?

The failure of the US, South Korea, and the UN to take effective action to respond to North Korean attacks is one of the main reasons.

Irregular six-party talks and sanctions do not seem to have much impact on the North Korean regime. Current sanctions harm North Korean citizens, and not the leaders of the regime. Economic sanctions and suspending food aid for North Korea only starve common people.

When North Korea attacked the Cheonan, neither the United States, South Korea, nor the United Nations took any retaliatory actions that affected the leadership of North Korea. Instead, the United States only expanded its economic sanctions and the United Nations Security Council wasn't even able to hold North Korea accountable because of the threat of a veto by China.


Facebook

The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) was established under a Korean Stalinist communist, Kim Il-Sung, in August, 1948. North Korea invaded South Korea in June 1950. By October 1950, UN forces had driven the North Korean army back to the border with China. In November 1950, the Chinese army invaded Korea and drove UN forces back to the 38th Parallel. An Armistice Agreement was reached in 1953, effectively ending the Korean War.

Kim Il Sung ruled North Korea until he died in 1994. His communist party ruled North Korea through terror and genocide. In a succession strangely reminiscent of Korean royal dynasties, Kim Il Sung’s son, Kim Jong-Il took power in 1994 and maintained totalitarian communist rule. Now he has died and power has passed to the next in the dynastic line, his son, Kim Jong-Un.

The Kim regimes have committed genocide and political mass killings since the creation of North Korea. Genocide Watch has ample proof that genocide has been committed and mass killing is still underway in North Korea. Our prediction is that when North Korean people eventually rise up against their totalitarian government, which is almost inevitable, North Korea’s powerful million-man army, now armed with nuclear weapons, will be used to crush the revolt. We predict that North Korea could become the worst politicide since World War Two.

North Korea has already committed genocide against citizens who belong to minority racial, religious, political, and national groups. Before Korea was divided in 1948, there were millions of Christians who lived in North Korea. According to Robert Park, the author of “North Korea and the Genocide Convention,” about 30 percent of the population in Pyongyang was Christian before the division. However, when Kim Il-Sung became the leader of North Korea, the country became the “worst violator of religious freedom in the world” and committed mass killings of Christians (Park, 2011). Hundreds of thousands of Christians were murdered by the regime and many more are still held in prison camps today. Open Doors USA reported that about 200,000 North Koreans are currently held in political prison camps and about 50,000 of them are Christians (Kerby, 2011).

National and racial groups have also been targeted by the North Korean regime. Many North Koreans have fled to China since 1948. Many refugees are women and eighty percent of those who remain in China are forced into prostitution or forced marriages (Park, 2011). China also returns North Korean women to North Korea even if they are married to Chinese citizens. They are usually executed or sent to concentration camps. Women who are impregnated by men who are not North Koreans, often Chinese or Chinese-Korean, are forced into having abortions in order to prevent other national or racial groups from becoming part of the North Korean population. Children who are not fully North Korean are murdered by the North Korean regime.

Widespread politicide has also been committed by the regime. People suspected of holding non-communist political opinions or who are not ethnically fully North Korean are held in concentration camps or prisons. According to a report released by Amnesty International, most of the political prisoners are held in “Total Control Zones,” from which they will never be able to leave. These zones have grown over the last decade into a vast gulag. Over 200,000 North Koreans are held in these prison camps and a third of them are children (Park, 2011).

According to former guards and heads of these prison camps, prisoners are treated inhumanely by being used for medical experiments as well as exterminated in gas chambers. Children born in the gulag will be slave laborers for life. N.C. Heiken, the director of the film “Kimjongilia,” claims, “this child is being raised as a slave or an animal” (Park, 2011).

Famine, caused by North Korea’s disastrously inefficient food production and distribution system, and also intentionally caused by the state by refusal to distribute food to entire regions has caused millions of deaths from starvation since 1948, especially in the 1980’s. Food shortages continue to be a

major reason why North Koreans are dying today. The United Nations World Food Program reports that North Korea is facing the worst food shortage in the world today.

North Korea has a population of 24 million and a quarter of them, 6 million people, are severely suffering from food shortages and malnutrition. The government feeds its million-man army well, and devotes much of it budget to weapons production and nuclear arms development. The government does not spend enough to purchase food for its own citizens. Children are severely mal-nourished. Refugees who have managed to flee from North Korea tell the media that people are starving to death and eating manure when there is nothing else to eat.

North Korea is a serial killer state. To make matters worse, it now has the capacity to commit the ultimate genocide. North Korea has joined the exclusive club of nations with nuclear weapons. Even if other nations wanted to exercise the responsibility to protect North Korea’s people, a nuclear-armed North Korea, backed by China, would render intervention impossible. The border of North Korea is only a few kilometers from Seoul, South Korea, which has become a democracy and an economic power. A North Korean invasion of South Korea would kill millions of people and even result in nuclear war.

Six-Party talks have been underway since 2003 with North Korea, South Korea, China, Japan, the United States, and Russia but have resulted in no improvements for the human rights of the North Korean people. North Korea has launched missiles several times in the sea near Japan. In March 2010, North Korea was almost certainly responsible for sinking the Cheonan, a South Korean Navy patrol ship, which killed 46 South Korean sailors. North Korea is not only committing mass killings of its own people, but also threatening international peace and security.

How has the North Korean regime been able to get away with mass killings since 1948?

The failure of the US, South Korea, and the UN to take effective action to respond to North Korean attacks is one of the main reasons.

Irregular six-party talks and sanctions do not seem to have much impact on the North Korean regime. Current sanctions harm North Korean citizens, and not the leaders of the regime. Economic sanctions and suspending food aid for North Korea only starve common people.

When North Korea attacked the Cheonan, neither the United States, South Korea, nor the United Nations took any retaliatory actions that affected the leadership of North Korea. Instead, the United States only expanded its economic sanctions and the United Nations Security Council wasn't even able to hold North Korea accountable because of the threat of a veto by China.


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